Harness Cross-Functional Centrality of Data Analytics for Competitive Advantage – Part 1 of 2

High Level Data Analytics Graph
(Healthcare Example)

 <—- Click on image to view GRAPH ANIMATION

Michael Porter, in an excellent article in the November 2014 issue of the Harvard Business Review[1], points out that smart connected products are broadening competitive boundaries to encompass related products that meet a broader underlying need. Porter elaborates that the boundary shift is not only from the functionality of discrete products to cross-functionality of product systems, but in many cases expanding to a system of systems such as a smart home or smart city.

So what does all this mean from a data perspective? In that same article, Porter mentions that companies seeking leadership need to invest in capturing, coordinating, and analyzing more extensive data across multiple products and systems (including external information). The key take-away is that the movement of gaining competitive advantage by searching for cross-functional or cross-system insights from data is only going to accelerate and not slow down. Exploiting cross-functional or cross-system centrality of data better than anyone else will continue to remain critical to achieving a sustainable competitive advantage.

Understandably, as technology changes, the mechanisms and architecture used to exploit this cross-system centrality of data will evolve. Current technology trends point to a need for a data & analytic-centric approach that leverages the right tool for the right job and orchestrates these technologies to mask complexity for the end users; while also managing complexity for IT in a hybrid environment. (See this article published in Teradata Magazine.)

As businesses embrace the data & analytic-centric approach, the following types of questions will need to be addressed: How can business and IT decide on when to combine which data and to what degree? What should be the degree of data integration (tight, loose, non-coupled)? Where should the data reside and what is the best data modeling approach (full, partial, need based)? What type of analytics should be applied on what data?

Of course, to properly address these questions, an architecture assessment is called for. But for the sake of going beyond the obvious, one exploratory data point in addressing such questions could be to measure and analyze the cross-functional/cross-system centrality of data.

By treating data and analytics as a network of interconnected nodes in Gephi[2], the connectedness between data and analytics can be measured and visualized for such exploration. We can examine a statistical metric called Degree Centrality[3] which is calculated based on how well an analytic node is connected.

The high level sample data analytics graph demonstrates the cross-functional Degree Centrality of analytics from an Industry specific perspective (Healthcare). It also amplifies, from an industry perspective, the need for organizations to build an analytical ecosystem that can easily harness this cross-functional Degree Centrality of data analytics. (Learn more about Teradata’s Unified Data Architecture.)

In the second part of this blog post series we will walk through a zoomed-in view of the graph, analyze the Degree Centrality measurements for sample analytics, and draw some high-level data architecture implications.

[1] https://hbr.org/2014/11/how-smart-connected-products-are-transforming-competition

[2] Gephi is a tool to explore and understand graphs. It is a complementary tool to traditional statistics.

[3] Degree centrality is defined as the number of links incident upon a node (i.e., the number of ties that a node has).

Ojustwin blog bio

Ojustwin Naik (MBA, JD) is a Director with 15 years of experience in planning, development, and delivery of Analytics. He has experience across multiple industries and is passionate at nurturing a culture of innovation based on clarity, context, and collaboration.

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