data analytics roadshow

Big Apple Hosts the Final Big Analytics Roadshow of the Year

Posted on: November 26th, 2013 by Teradata Aster No Comments

 

Speaking of ending things on a high note, New York City on December 6th will play host to the final event in the Big Analytics 2013 Roadshow series. Big Analytics 2013 New York is taking place at the Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers in the heart of Midtown on bustling 7th Avenue.

As we reflect on the illustrious journey of the Big Analytics 2013 Roadshow, kicking off in San Francisco, this year the Roadshow traveled through major international destinations including Atlanta, Dallas, Beijing, Tokyo, London and finally culminating at the Big Apple – it truly capsulated the appetite today for collecting, processing, understanding and analyzing data.

Big Analytics Atlanta 2013 photo

Big Analytics Roadshow 2013 stops in Atlanta

Drawing business & technical audiences across the globe, the roadshow afforded the attendees an opportunity to learn more about the convergence of technologies and methods like data science, digital marketing, data warehousing, Hadoop, and discovery platforms. Going beyond the “big data” hype, the event offered learning opportunities on how technologies and ideas combine to drive real business innovation. Our unyielding focus on results from data is truly what made the events so successful.

Continuing on with the rich lineage of delivering quality Big Data information, the New York event promises to pack tremendous amount of Big Data learning & education. The keynotes for the event include such industry luminaries as Dan Vesset, Program VP of Business Analytics at IDC, Tasso Argyros, Senior VP of Big Data at Teradata & Peter Lee, Senior VP of Tibco Software.

Photo of the Teradata Aster team in Dallas

Teradata team at the Dallas Big Analytics Roadshow


The keynotes will be followed by three tracks around Big Data Architecture, Data Science & Discovery & Data Driven Marketing. Each of these tracks will feature industry luminaries like Richard Winter of WinterCorp, John O’Brien of Radiant Advisors & John Lovett of Web Analytics Demystified. They will be joined by vendor presentations from Shaun Connolly of Hortonworks, Todd Talkington of Tableau & Brian Dirking of Alteryx.

As with every Big Analytics event, it presents an exciting opportunity to hear first hand from leading organizations like Comcast, Gilt Groupe & Meredith Corporation on how they are using Big Data Analytics & Discovery to deliver tremendous business value.

In summary, the event promises to be nothing less than the Oscars of Big Data and will bring together the who’s who of the Big Data industry. So, mark your calendars, pack your bags and get ready to attend the biggest Big Data event of the year.

 

We live in interesting times!

In the past 30 years, data was used to record business events and report on business events. Over the last 5 years, data has gotten closer to business. Now data is being used to record business events, report on business events as well as influence business events. We now realize that the more data we record, the more comprehensively data can influence business events.

Hence the excitement of "big data" - it is a business opportunity for each line of business - to influence business events to have favorable outcomes.

The responsibility for technologists is to provide the right platforms and tools to make influencing business easy and simple.

There are TWO relentless forces that are playing out in the big data space to which technology has to respond.

The first force is the diversity of data. As we record more data, we end up having different formats of data to manage. About 20% is relational, but we also have text, emails, PDF, Twitter feeds, Facebook profiles, social graphs, CDRs, Apache logs, JSON formats, …

The second force is the richness of analytics. As we influence more business, we end up having richer analytics to perform. About 20% is SQL, but we also have time series analysis, statistical analysis, geo-spatial analysis, graph analysis, sentiment analysis, entity extraction, …

Note that I am not saying MapReduce doesn't have a diverse set of analytics to do: MapReduce is a way of programming to do analysis - time series, statistical, geo-spatial - each require different MapReduce programs to be written.

Today, the platforms and tools for big data are very complex. They expect lines of business owners to write programs to manage different forms of big data, to write sophisticated programs to analyze big data, to master the management and administration of big clusters and be self-sustaining in managing data quality. This last point is very important - data values change over time. We have to keep values consistent, otherwise our analysis will be wrong and our influence on business will be negative - garbage in, garbage out rule of computing.

As a result, big data is in danger of entering the DIY (do it yourself) space. A line of business is now expected to support big clusters = big administration = big programs = big friction = low influence.

We have to acknowledge these challenges as technologists. If we let big data solutions be a DIY solution, only pockets of enterprise will embrace big data - the rest of the non-technology savvy business leaders will be left out of the opportunity.

We have to simplify this equation. We need to enable line of business owners to benefit from big data a lot more easily. We have to make it simpler for business leaders to get from big data to big analytics.

Our goal, big data = small clusters = easy administration = big analytics = big influence.

This entails solving the following problems:

[1] Make platform and tools to be easier to use to manage and curate data. Otherwise, garbage in = garbage out, and you will get garbage analytics.

[2] Provide rich analytics functions out of the box. Each line of programming cuts your reachable audience by 50%.

[3] Provide tools to update or delete data. Otherwise, data consistency will drift away from truth as history accumulates.

[4] Provide applications to leverage data and find answers relevant to business. Otherwise the cost of DIY applications is too high to influence business - and won't be done.

At Teradata Aster, we are continuing to lead the big data revolution. We have led the revolution for the past 5 years, and helped shape the market and technologies. We are convinced that the path to big data success is to connect it with Big Analytics in the coming 5 years.