digital marketing

Big Apple Hosts the Final Big Analytics Roadshow of the Year

Posted on: November 26th, 2013 by Teradata Aster No Comments

 

Speaking of ending things on a high note, New York City on December 6th will play host to the final event in the Big Analytics 2013 Roadshow series. Big Analytics 2013 New York is taking place at the Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers in the heart of Midtown on bustling 7th Avenue.

As we reflect on the illustrious journey of the Big Analytics 2013 Roadshow, kicking off in San Francisco, this year the Roadshow traveled through major international destinations including Atlanta, Dallas, Beijing, Tokyo, London and finally culminating at the Big Apple – it truly capsulated the appetite today for collecting, processing, understanding and analyzing data.

Big Analytics Atlanta 2013 photo

Big Analytics Roadshow 2013 stops in Atlanta

Drawing business & technical audiences across the globe, the roadshow afforded the attendees an opportunity to learn more about the convergence of technologies and methods like data science, digital marketing, data warehousing, Hadoop, and discovery platforms. Going beyond the “big data” hype, the event offered learning opportunities on how technologies and ideas combine to drive real business innovation. Our unyielding focus on results from data is truly what made the events so successful.

Continuing on with the rich lineage of delivering quality Big Data information, the New York event promises to pack tremendous amount of Big Data learning & education. The keynotes for the event include such industry luminaries as Dan Vesset, Program VP of Business Analytics at IDC, Tasso Argyros, Senior VP of Big Data at Teradata & Peter Lee, Senior VP of Tibco Software.

Photo of the Teradata Aster team in Dallas

Teradata team at the Dallas Big Analytics Roadshow


The keynotes will be followed by three tracks around Big Data Architecture, Data Science & Discovery & Data Driven Marketing. Each of these tracks will feature industry luminaries like Richard Winter of WinterCorp, John O’Brien of Radiant Advisors & John Lovett of Web Analytics Demystified. They will be joined by vendor presentations from Shaun Connolly of Hortonworks, Todd Talkington of Tableau & Brian Dirking of Alteryx.

As with every Big Analytics event, it presents an exciting opportunity to hear first hand from leading organizations like Comcast, Gilt Groupe & Meredith Corporation on how they are using Big Data Analytics & Discovery to deliver tremendous business value.

In summary, the event promises to be nothing less than the Oscars of Big Data and will bring together the who’s who of the Big Data industry. So, mark your calendars, pack your bags and get ready to attend the biggest Big Data event of the year.

Introducing In-Database Visual MapReduce Functions

Posted on: February 20th, 2013 by Teradata Aster No Comments

 

Ever since Aster Data became part of Teradata a couple years ago, we have been fortunate to have the resources and focus to accelerate our rate of product innovation. In the past 8 months alone, we have led the market in deploying big analytics on Hadoop and introducing an ultra-fast appliance for discovering big data insights. Our focus is to provide the market with the best big data discovery platform; that is, the most efficient, cost-effective, and enterprise-friendly way to extract valuable business insights form massive piles of structured and unstructured data.

Today I am excited to announce another significant innovation that extends our lead in this direction. For the first time, we are introducing in-database, SQL-MapReduce-based visualization functions, as part of the Teradata Aster Discovery Platform 5.10 software release. These are functions that take the output of an analytical process (either SQL or MapReduce) and create an interactive data visualization that can be accessed directly from our platform through any web browser. There are several functions that we are introducing with today's announcement, including functions that let you visualize flows of people or events, graphs, and arbitrary patterns. These functions complement your existing BI solution by extending the types of information you can visualize without adding the complexity of another BI deployment.

It did take some significant engineering effort and innovation from our field in working with customers to make a discovery platform produce in-database, in-process visualizations. So, why bother? Because these functions have three powerful characteristics: they are beautiful; powerful; and instant. Let me elaborate in reverse order.

Instant: the goal of a discovery platform like Aster’s is to accelerate the hypothesis --> analysis --> validation iteration process. One of the major big data challenges is that the data is so complex that you don't even know what questions to ask. So you start with 10s or 100s of possible questions that you need to quickly implement and validate until you find the couple questions that extract the gold nuggets of information from the data. Besides analyzing the data, having access to instant visualizations can help data scientists and business analysts understand if they are down the right path of finding the insights they're looking for. Being able to rapidly analyze and – now – visualize the insights in-process can rapidly accelerate the discovery cycle and save an analysts time and cost by more than 80% as has been recently validated.    

Powerful: Aster comes with a broad library of pre-built SQL-MapReduce functions. Some of the most powerful, like nPath, crunch terabytes of customer or event data and produce patterns of activity that yield significant insights in a single pass of the data, regardless of the complexity of the pattern or history being analyzed. In the past, visualizing these insights required a lot of work – even after the insight was generated. This is because there were no specialized visualization tools that could consume the insight as-is to produce the visualizations. Abstracting the insights in order to visualize them is sub-optimal since it is killing the 'a-ha!' moment. With today’s announcement, we provide analysts with the ability to natively visualize concepts such as a graph of interactions or patterns of customer behavior with no compromises and no additional effort!

Beautiful: We all know that numbers and data are only as good as the story that goes with them. By having access to instant, powerful and also aesthetically beautiful in-database visualizations, you can do justice to your insights and communicate them effectively to the rest of the organization, whether that means business clients, executives, or peer analysts.

In addition, with this announcement we are introducing four buckets of pre-built SQL-MapReduce functions, I.e. Java functions that can be accessed through a familiar SQL or BI interface. These buckets are Data Acquisition (connecting to external sources and acquiring data); Data Preparation (manipulate structured and unstructured data to quickly prepare for analysis); Data Analytics (everything from path and pattern analysis to statistics and marketing analytics); and Data Visualization (introduced today). This is the most powerful collection of big data tools available in the industry today, and we're proud to provide them to our customers.

Teradata Aster Discovery Portfolio - figure 2

Our belief is that our industry is still scratching the surface in terms of providing powerful analytical tools to enterprises that help them find more valuable insights, more quickly and more easily. With today's launch, the Teradata Aster Discovery Platform reconfirms its lead as the most powerful and enterprise-friendly tool for big data analytics.

Big Insights from Big Analytics Roadshow

Posted on: January 25th, 2013 by Teradata Aster No Comments

 

Last month in New York we completed the 4th and final event in the Big Analytics 2012 roadshow. This series of events shared ideas on practical ways to address the big data challenge in organizations and change the conversation from “technology” to “business value”. In New York alone, 500 people attended from across both business and IT and we closed out the event with two speaker panels. The data science panel was, in my opinion, one of the most engaging and interesting panels I’ve ever seen at an event like this. The topic was on whether organizations really need a data scientist (and what’s different about the skill set from other analytic professionals). Mike Gualtieri from Forrester Research did a great job leading & prodding the discussion.

Overall, these events were a great way to learn and network. The events had great speakers from cutting-edge companies, universities, and industry thought-leaders including LinkedIn, DJ Patil, Barnes & Noble, Razorfish, Gilt Groupe, eBay, Mike Gualtieri from Forrester Research, Wayne Eckerson, and Mohan Sawhney from Kellogg School of Management.

As an aside, I’ve long observed that there has been a historic disconnect between marketing groups and the IT organizations and data warehouses that they support. I noticed this first when I worked at Business Objects where very few reporting applications ever included Web clickstream data. The marketing department always used a separate tool or application like Web Side Story (now part of Adobe) to handle this. There is a bridge being built to connect these worlds – both in terms of technology which can handle web clickstream and other customer interactional data, but also new analytic techniques which make it easier for marketing/business analysts to understand their customers more intimately and better serve them a relevant experience.

We ran a survey at the events, and I wanted to share some top takeaways. The events were split into business and technical tracks with themes of “data science” and “digital marketing”. Thus, the survey data compares the responses from those who were more interested in technology than the business content, so we can compare their responses. The survey data includes responses from 507 people in San Francisco, 322 in Boston, 441 in Chicago, and 894 in New York City for a total of 2164 respondents.

You can get the full set of graphs here, but here are a couple of my own observations / conclusions in looking at the data:

1)      “Who is talking about big data analytics in your organization?” - IT and Marketing were by far the largest responses with nearly 60% of IT organizations and 43% of marketing departments talking about it. New York had slightly higher # of CIO’s and CEO’s talking about big data at 23 and 21%, respectively

 Survey Data: Figure 1

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2)      “Where is big data analytics in your company” - Across all cities, “customer interactions in Web/social/mobile” was 62% - the biggest area of big data analytics. With all the hype around machine/sensor data, it was surprisingly only being discussed in 20% of organizations. Since web servers and mobile devices are machines, it would have been interesting to see how the “machine generated data” responses would have been if we had taken the more specific example of customer interactions away

 Survey Data: Figure 2

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

3)      This chart is a more detailed breakdown of the areas where big data analytics is found, broken down by city. NYC has a few more “other.” Some of the “other” answers in NYC included:

  1. Claims
  2. Client Data Cloud
  3. Development, and Data Center Systems
  4. Customer Solutions
  5. Data Protection
  6. Education
  7. Financial Transaction
  8. Healthcare data
  9. Investment Research
  10. Market Data
  11.  Predictive Analytics (sales and servicing)
  12. Research
  13. Risk management /analytics
  14. Security

 Survey Data: Figure 3

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

4)      “What are the Greatest Big Analytics Application Opportunities for Businesses Today? – on average, general “data discovery or data science” was highest at 72%, with “digital marketing optimization” as second with just under 60% of respondents. In New York, “fraud detection and prevention” at 39% was slightly higher than in other cities, perhaps tied to the # of financial institutions in attendance

 Survey Data: Figure 4

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In summary, there are lots of applications for big data analytics, but having a discovery platform which supports iterative exploration of ALL types of data and can support both business/marketing analysts as well as savvy data scientists is important. The divide between business groups like marketing and IT are closing. Marketers are more technically savvy and the most demanding for analytic solutions which can harness the deluge of customer interaction data. They need to partner closely with IT to architect the right solutions which tackle “big analytics” and provide the right toolsets to give the self-service access to this information without always requiring developer or IT support.

We are planning to sponsor the Big Analytics roadshow again in 2013 and take it international, as well. If you attended the event and have feedback or requests for topics, please let us know. I hear that there will be a “call for papers” going out soon. You can view the speaker bios & presentations from the Big Analytics 2012 events for ideas.