Taking Charge of Your Data Lake Destiny

Posted on: April 30th, 2014 by Cesar Rojas No Comments

One of the most interesting areas of my job is having the opportunity to take an active role in helping shape the future of big data analytics. A significant part of this is the maturation of the open source offerings available to customers and how they can help address today’s analytic conundrums. Customers are constantly looking for new and effective ways to organize their data and they want to build the systems that will empower them to be successful across their organizations. But with the proliferation of data and the rise of data types and analytical models, solving this challenge is becoming increasingly complex.

One of the solutions that has become popular is the concept of a data lake. The idea of a data lake emerged when users were creating new types of data that needed to be captured and exploited across their enterprise. The concept is also tied quite closely to Apache Hadoop and its ecosystem of open source projects so, as you can imagine, since two of my main focus areas (big data analytics and Hadoop) are being brought together, this is an area to which I often pay close attention. Data lakes are designed to tackle some of the emerging big data challenges by offering a new way to organize and build the next generation of systems. They provide a cost effective and technologically refined way to approach and solve big data challenges. However, while data lakes are an important component of the logical data warehouse – because they are designed to give the user choices in order to better manage and utilize data within their analytical ecosystem – many users are also finding that the data lake is also an obvious evolution of their current Apache Hadoop ecosystem and their existing data architecture.

Where do we begin? Quite simply, several questions need to be answered before you start down this path. For instance, it’s important to understand how the data lake is related to your existing enterprise data warehouse, how they work together, and quite possibly the most important question is “What best practices should be leveraged to ensure the resulting strategy drives business value?”

A recent white paper written by CITO Research and sponsored by Teradata and Hortonworks, takes a close look at the data lake and provides answers to all of the above questions, and then some. Without giving away too much of the detail, I thought I would capture a few of the points that impress me most in this paper.

In fact, the data lake has come a long way since its initial entry into the big data scene. Its first iteration included several limitations, making it slightly daunting to general users. The original data lakes were batch-oriented, offering very limited abilities for user interaction with the data, and expertise with MapReduce and other scripting and query capabilities were absolutely necessary for success. Those factors, among others, limited its ability to be widely adopted. Today, however, the landscape is changing. With the arrival of Hadoop 2, and more specifically the release 2.1 of Hortonworks, data lakes are evolving. New Hadoop projects bolstered better resource management and application multi-tenancy allowing multiple workloads on the same cluster that enable users from different business units within organizations to effectively refine, explore, and enrich data. Today, enterprise Hadoop is a full-fledged data lake, with new capabilities being added all the time.

While the capabilities of a data lake evolved over the last few years, so did the world of big data. Companies everywhere started creating data lakes to complement the capabilities of their data warehouses but now must also tackle creating a logical data warehouse in which the data lake and the enterprise data warehouse can be maximized individually -- and yet support each other in the best way possible as well.

The enterprise data warehouse plays a critical role in solving big data challenges, and together with the data lake, the possibilities can deliver real business value. The enterprise data warehouse is a highly designed sophisticated system that provides a single version of the truth that can be used over and over again. And, like a data lake, it supports batch workloads. Unlike a data lake, the enterprise data warehouse also supports simultaneous use by thousands of concurrent users performing reporting and analytic tasks.

There are several impressive uses for a data lake and several beneficial outcomes can result. It is very worthwhile to learn more about data lakes and how they can help you to store and process data at low cost. You can also learn how to create a distributed form of analytics, or learn how the data lake and the enterprise data warehouse have started to work together as a hybrid, unified system that empowers users to ask questions that can be answered by more data and more analytics with less effort. To start learning about these initiatives, download our whitepaper here.

By Cesar Rojas - bio link 

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