Teradata RainStor’s Compression and Performance Technology

It is well-known that there are two extreme alternatives for storing database tables on any storage media: storing it row-by-row (as done by traditional “row-store” technology) or storing it column-by-column (as done by recently popular “column-store” implementations). Row-stores store the entire first row of the table, followed by the entire second row of the table, etc. Column-stores store the entire first column of the table, followed by the entire second column of the table, etc. There have been huge amounts of research literature and commercial whitepapers that discuss the various advantages of these alternative approaches, along with various proposals for hybrid solutions (which I discussed in more detail in my previous post).

abadi blog clamp image abadiDespite the many conflicting arguments in favor of these different approaches, there is little question that column-stores compress data much better than row-stores. The reason is fairly intuitive: in a column-store, entire columns are stored contiguously — in other words, a series of values from the same attribute domain are stored consecutively. In a row-store, values from different attribute domains are interspersed, thereby reducing the self-similarity of the data. In general the more self-similarity (lower entropy) you have in a dataset, the more compressible it is. Hence, column-stores are more compressible than row-stores.

In general, compression rates are very sensitive to the particular dataset that is being compressed. Therefore it is impossible to make any kind of guarantees about how much a particular database system/compression algorithm will compress an arbitrary dataset. However, as a general rule of thumb, it is reasonable to expect around 8X compression if a column-store is used on many kinds of datasets. 8X compression means that the compressed dataset is 1/8th the original size, and scan-based queries over the dataset can thus proceed approximately 8 times as fast. This stellar compression and resulting performance improvements are a major contributor to the recent popularity of column-stores.

It is precisely this renowned compression of column-stores which makes the compression rate of RainStor (a recent Teradata acquisition) so impressive in comparison. RainStor claims a factor of 5 times more compression than what column-stores are able to achieve on the same datasets, and 40X compression overall.

Although the reason why column-stores compress data better than row-stores is fairly intuitive, the reason why RainStor can compress data better than column-stores is less intuitive. Therefore, we will now explain this in more detail.

Take for example the following table, which is a subset of a table describing orders from a particular retail enterprise that sells bicycles and related parts. (A real table would have many more rows and columns, but we keep this example simple so that it is easier to understand what is going on).

Record Order date Ship date Product Price
1 03/22/2015 03/23/2015 “bicycle” 300
2 03/22/2015 03/24/2015 “lock” 18
3 03/22/2015 03/24/2015 “tire” 70
4 03/22/2015 03/23/2015 “lock” 18
5 03/22/2015 03/24/2015 “bicycle” 250
6 03/22/2015 03/23/2015 “bicycle” 280
7 03/22/2015 03/23/2015 “tire” 70
8 03/22/2015 03/23/2015 “lock” 18
9 03/22/2015 03/24/2015 “bicycle” 280
10 03/23/2015 03/24/2015 “lock” 18
11 03/23/2015 03/25/2015 “bicycle” 300
12 03/23/2015 03/24/2015 “bicycle” 280
13 03/23/2015 03/24/2015 “tire” 70
14 03/23/2015 03/25/2015 “bicycle” 250
15 03/23/2015 03/25/2015 “bicycle” 280

 

The table contains 15 records and shows four attributes — the order and ship dates of a particular product; the product that was purchased, and the purchase price. Note that there is a relationship between some of these columns — in particular the ship date is usually 1 or 2 days after the order date, and that the price of various products are usually consistent across orders, but there may be slight variations in price depending on what coupons the customer used to make the purchase.

A column-store would likely use “run-length encoding” to compress the order date column. Since records are sorted by order date, this would compress the column to its near-minimum — it can be compressed as (03/22/2015, 9); (03/23/2015, 6) — which indicates that 03/22/2015 is repeated 9 straight times, followed by 03/23/2015 which is repeated 6 times. The ship date column, although not sorted, is still very compressible, as each value can be expressed using a small number of bits in terms of how much larger (or smaller) it is from the previous value in the column. However, the other two columns — product and price — would likely be compressed using a variant of dictionary compression, where each value is mapped to the minimal number of bits needed represent it. For large datasets, where there are many unique values for price (or even for product), the number of bits needed to represent a dictionary entry is non-trivial, and the same dictionary entry is repeated in the compressed dataset for every repeated value in the original dataset.

In contrast, in RainStor, every unique value in the dataset is stored once (and only once), and every record is represented as a binary tree, where a breadth-first traversal of the tree enables the reconstruction of the original record. For example, the table shown above is compressed in RainStor using the forest of binary trees shown below. There are 15 binary trees (each of the 15 roots of these trees are shown using the green circles at the top of the figure), corresponding to the 15 records in the original dataset.abadi forest trees blog

Forest of Binary Trees Compression

For example, the binary tree corresponding to record 1 is shown on the left side of the figure. The root points to two children — the internal nodes “A” and “E”. In turn, node “A” points to 03/22/2015 (corresponding to the order date of record 1), and to 03/23/2015 (corresponding to the ship date of record 1). Node “E” points to “bicycle” (corresponding to the product of record 1) and “300” corresponding to the price of record 1).

Note that records 4, 6, and 7 also have an order date of 03/22/2015 and a ship date of 03/23/2015. Therefore, the roots of the binary trees corresponding to those records also point to internal node “A”. Similarly, note that record 11 also is associated with the purchase of a bicycle for $300. Therefore, the root for record 11 also points to internal node “E”.

These shared internal nodes are what makes RainStor’s compression algorithm fundamentally different from any algorithm that a column-store is capable of performing. Column-stores are forced to create dictionaries and search for patterns only within individual columns. In contrast, RainStor’s compression algorithm finds patterns across different columns — identifying the relationship between ship date and order date and the relationship between product and price, and leveraging these relationships to share branches in the trees that are formed, thereby eliminating redundant information. RainStor thus has fundamentally more room to search for patterns in the dataset and compress data by referencing these patterns via the (compressed) location of the root of the shared branch.

For a traditional archiving solution, compression rate is arguably the most important feature (right up there with immutability). Indeed, RainStor’s compression algorithm enables it to be used for archival use-cases, and RainStor provides all of the additional features you would expect from an archiving solution: encryption, LDAP/AD/PAM/Kerberos/PCI authentication and security, audit trails and logging, retention rules, expiry policies, and integrated implementation of existing compliance standards (e.g. SEC 17a-4).

However, what brings RainStor to the next level in the archival solutions market is that it is an “active” archive, meaning that the data that is managed by RainStor can be queried at high performance. RainStor provides a mature SQL stack for native querying of compressed RainStor data, including ANSI SQL 1992 and 2003 parsers, and a full MPP query execution engine. For enterprises with Hadoop clusters, RainStor is fully integrated with the Cloudera and Hortonworks distributions of Hadoop — RainStor compressed data files can be partitioned over a HDFS cluster, and queried in parallel with HiveQL (or MapReduce or Pig). Furthermore, RainStor integrates with YARN for resource management, with HCatalog for metadata management, and with Ambari for system monitoring and management.

The reason why most archival solutions are not “active” is that the compression algorithms used to reduce the data size before archival are so heavy-weight, that significant processing resources must be invested in decompressing the data before it can be queried. Therefore, it is preferable to leave the data archived in compressed form, and only decompress it at times of significant need. In general, a user should expect significant query performance reductions relative to querying uncompressed data, in order to account for the additional decompression time.

The beauty of RainStor’s compression algorithm is that even though it gets compression ratios comparable to other archival products, its compression algorithm is not so heavy-weight that the data must be decompressed prior to querying it. In particular, the binary tree structures shown above are actually fairly straightforward to perform query operations on directly, without requiring decompression prior to access. For example, a count distinct or a group-by operation can be performed via a scan of the leaves of the binary tees. Furthermore, selections can be performed via a reverse traversal of the binary trees from the leaves that match the selection predicate. In general, since there is a one-to-one mapping of records in the uncompressed dataset to the binary trees in RainStor’s compressed files, all query operations can be expressed in terms of operations on these binary trees. Therefore, RainStor queries can benefit from the I/O improvement of scanning in less data (due to the smaller size of the compressed files on disk/memory) without paying the decompression cost to fully decompress these compressed files after they are read from storage. This leads to RainStor’s claims of 2X-100X performance improvement on most queries — an industry-leading claim in the archival market.

In short, RainStor’s strong claims around compression and performance are backed up by the technology that is used under the covers. Its compression algorithm is able to identify and remove redundancy both within and across columns. Furthermore, the resulting data structures produced by the algorithm are amenable to direct operation on the compressed data. This allows the compressed files to be queried at high performance, and positions RainStor as a leading active-archive solution.

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Daniel Abadi is an Associate Professor at Yale University, founder of Hadapt, and a Teradata employee following the recent acquisition. He does research primarily in database system architecture and implementation. He received a Ph.D. from MIT and a M.Phil from Cambridge. He is best known for his research in column-store database systems (the C-Store project, which was commercialized by Vertica), high performance transactional systems (the H-Store project, commercialized by VoltDB), and Hadapt (acquired by Teradata). http://twitter.com/#!/daniel_abadi.

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